ST34 – Lessons from Engaging First Year Initial Teacher Trainee (ITT) students in co-creating curricular that embed equality and diversity.

Presentation
ROOM C – MONDAY 15:30-16:30

Maxwell A. Ayamba, Sheffield Institute of Education, Sheffield Hallam University
Maxine Greaves MBE, Sheffield Institute of Education, Sheffield Hallam University and Wal Warmington, Centre for Academic Success, Birmingham City University

Birmingham City University and Sheffield Hallam University

Maxwell A Ayamba: Environmental Journalist/Researcher. He is currently a PhD student at Sheffield Hallam University. He has published academic papers on the environment and Black and Minority Ethnic communities in England. He has 11 years of practical experience working directly in communities to promote educational engagement and participation in Further and Higher Education

Maxine Greaves MBE: Equality and Community Engagement Manager for the Faculty of Development & Society, with comprehensive knowledge of the qualifications framework and pre requisites for entry to Higher Education programmes.  Lead co-ordinator in a collaborative project to progress innovative educational provision for participants from diverse backgrounds

Wal Warmington: Wal Warmington is Lecturer Learning and Academic Development at Birmingham City University. His research interests include: race/racism in Higher Education; international students’ experiences; mentoring and peer support. He recently co-authored a book chapter on: ‘Student Engagement: Enabling Success through Dynamic Partnerships’ in ‘Student Engagement: Identity, Motivation and Community’

Summary

Lessons from engaging with First Year Initial Teacher Trainee (ITT) students in co-creating curricular that embed equality and diversity. This session will examine how relevant discussion and support systems can help further a critical understanding of issues around equality and diversity that contributes to the personal development of students.

Abstract

With regards to student engagement and belonging, UK Higher Education Institutions (UKHEI’s) face a range of challenges as they attempt to relate to, retain and support students on their courses (Thomas, 2012; Warmington, Hodge, Sela & Kainth, 2013). For those studying to teach within a multi-racial society developing an understanding of equality and diversity is critical if, once trained, such societal educators are to positively influence the education of others. For trainee teachers this is particularly acute given the challenge of weaving such issues into their lived experiences and emerging pedagogical practice.

If involved in co-creating specific aspects of the curriculum design and approval process, a range of equality principles can be embedded and strategically aligned to their module learning outcomes. These can be furthered through developing understanding of learning processes, critical self-reflection, action planning and goal setting that demonstrate how diversity adds value to their personal and professional practice.

This session will examine how relevant support systems can help further a critical understanding of issues around equality and diversity that contributes to the personal development of students.

Issues & Questions for participants:

How do concepts of equality and diversity shape our understanding of ourselves and in our relationships with others?

In terms of actions and outcomes how do such concepts apply to our organisations and communities?

References  

Thomas, L. (2012) Building student engagement and belonging in Higher Education at a time of change – What works? In Student Retention and Success – Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), Paul Hamlyn Foundation (PHF), Higher Education Academy  (HEA), Action on Access (AOA).

Warmington, W., Hodge, T., Sela, S. & Kainth, A. (2013) ‘Student Engagement: Enabling Success through Dynamic Partnerships’. In Nygaard, C., Brand, S., Bartholomew, P. & Millard, L. (Eds.) ‘Student Engagement: Identity, Motivation and Community’. Farringdon, Oxfordshire: Libri Publishing

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